Thesis Statement Rap Flocabulary Week In Rap

Want Flocabulary to shout out your school in The Week in Rap?
Then enter the...

For a shout-out on Friday, March 23, entries are due Thursday, March 15 by 6 PM EST.

Rap an Acceptance Speech

This week we covered the 90th Academy Awards. If you won an Oscar what would you say in your speech? How would you use the time to thank family, friends and advocate for a cause you believe in? Tell us in at least eight lines of rap or prose.

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Email entries to contest@flocabulary.com, including your name, school and location. If submitting more than one student entry, please submit all entries in a single email.

Note: Students, your teachers must submit for you. Any video submissions must be horizontal.

HOW IT WORKS

Every Thursday at 6 PM EST, we'll announce the week's contest prompt. You have a week to submit your entry. The contest closes when we post a new prompt. Winners will be notified on Friday by 12 noon EST, and they will have one week to submit a video or photo to be included in the Week in Rap video with the shout out. We'll shout out the winner's school in the next Week in Rap video (two weeks after the initial contest was posted)!

A little fine print: You must be 18 years or older to enter the contest. Teachers and parents can submit on behalf of their students and children, and can submit as many times as they'd like. By submitting a photo or video that features any students, teachers are agreeing that they’ve obtained parental consent to have the likeness of their child posted on the internet in a way that’s accessible by the public. By entering the contest, you agree to comply with the Official Rules.

How do words and phrases give music to language? In this unit, you'll learn how to create rhythm, identify rhyme scheme and use rhyme in your own writing, and a Flocabulary lyricist and rapper will share five techniques you can use when writing rhymes.

This transitions rap song uses the history of video games--from Pong to today--to demonstrate how to use transition words. Have you ever played Pong, Space Invaders, Final Fantasy or Angry Birds? Then you’re not alone. Here at Flocabulary we’ve played them all and more. Using transition words like “nonetheless,” “simultaneously,” “beyond,” “similarly” and “finally,” we’re ready to tell you all about them. And we promise: the transitions will be smooth.

This transitions rap song uses the history of video games--from Pong to today--to demonstrate how to use transition words. Have you ever played Pong, Space Invaders, Final Fantasy or Angry Birds? Then you’re not alone. Here at Flocabulary we’ve played them all and more. Using transition words like “nonetheless,” “simultaneously,” “beyond,” “similarly” and “finally,” we’re ready to tell you all about them. And we promise: the transitions will be smooth.

Characters: They can be confident, shy, brave, generous, cautious, foolish, friendly, energetic or determined. This video teaches how to identify a character’s traits using their words, actions, thoughts and feelings and the reactions of other characters. It gives examples of direct and indirect characterization and shows how to use evidence from the story to infer a character’s traits.

This song teaches techniques for writing and speaking persuasively. Students learn to solidify their arguments by providing thoughtful reasoning and good presentation.

This song teaches four ways to define unknown words using context clues: synonyms, antonyms, explanations and examples.

This song teaches students how to identify Who, What, When, Where and Why in a story.

In this unit, you'll learn all about subject-verb agreement. Single subjects go with singular verbs, and plural subjects go with plural verbs. Learn grammar rules to help you find the subject of your sentence and conjugate the verb correctly.

Prefixes are useful for determining the meanings of words. Even the word “prefix” has a prefix in it! Prefixes tell you about a word, right from the start. This prefix rap song reviews common prefixes including non-, un-, il-, dis-, anti-, inter-, re-, tele-, semi- and fore-.

Suffixes do a lot. They can change the meanings of words and parts of speech. Suffixes can help you define words too. This suffix rap song reviews commons suffixes like -able, -ful, -ous, -tion, -less and -ward. Listen to learn many of the most useful and most taught suffixes.

Teach prepositional phrases for the Common Core with this video. Follow the story of a boy, his dog and a bully named Mike to learn how to use prepositions to tell a story. Students will learn to recognize prepositions like "through," "past" and "during" and can try their hand at creating their own prepositional phrases.

This video defines and gives examples of independent and dependent clauses and shows how to join them to form complex sentences. It explains the rules for using commas when writing complex sentences and gives examples of subordinating conjunctions that can be found at the beginning of dependent clauses.

Sing along with this synonym and antonym rap song to learn when and how to use synonyms and antonyms. Synonyms say the same thing again and again. Antonyms don’t mean the same thing - they mean the opposite. You can use synonyms when you want to describe something but don’t want to use the same word over and over again, lest you get boring and repetitive.

This video gives examples and explanations of comma rules. Students will learn where to put a comma when writing dates, addresses, quotations and the salutation and close of letters. They'll also learn when and how to use commas with introductory words and phrases, lists, compound sentences and dependent clauses.

If you want to write, you’ve got to know how to construct sentences. It’s that simple—or compound! This video teaches how to write simple and compound sentences, explaining the components and providing examples of each.

What makes a poem? While many poems have regular meter and rhyme, others aren’t bound by these rules. In this unit, students will learn about several common types of poetry, including sonnets, haiku and limericks.

ELA Videos

Get a taste of some of Flocabulary's most-loved ELA videos! From grammar to research, we've got goodies for everyone.

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